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Dance artists investigate a queer transition, water, and sensitive brains in Co.ERASGA Studio Salon Series

Justin Calvadores and Sevrin Emnacen-Boyd (photo by Sion Kim)
Justin Calvadores and Sevrin Emnacen-Boyd (photo by Sion Kim) are part of Co.ERASGA's Studio Salon Series at Vancouver's What Lab on November 25 and 26.

Modern dance is often intimate experience for both performers and audiences.

That will most certainly be the case with Co.ERASGA’s upcoming Studio Salon Series. Involving several talented dancers from underrepresented communities, it takes place live at 5 p.m. on November 25 and 26 at What Lab (#202–1814 Pandora Street).

The venue is limiting in-person audience to 30 people per show at these free events.

One of the dancers will be rising Filipinx star Justin Calvadores, who prefers the pronouns they and them. On the opening night, Calvadores will explore queerness and identity.

“The work in process is described by queer transgression. The process of discovering hope and transformation through metabolizing loss and utilizing imagination to dream ad propel forward,” Calvadores says on the Co.ERASGA website.

Also dancing on November 25 is Sara U 余衍晴, an emerging choreographer in live and digital performances. In Silent Howl, U 余衍晴 will be joined by Alexandra Caprara, a queer multidisciplinary artist and theatre maker.

This show is described as “a multimedia performance that showcases a visual representation of neuron activities in a highly sensitive person’s brain”.

“The primary composition tool in this performance is lines; including straight, curve, zig zag, and dotted lines, with each line representing a different emotional response,” the Co.ERASGA website states. “Sarah is inspired by lines from her personal experience of practicing ‘re-focus therapy which is a recovery tool for HSP, ADHD, and anxiety peoples.”

Maddock and Emnancen-Boyd will dance

The following night, dance artist and choreographer Rachel Maddock will perform Unfill. She describes it as “investigating water as a source of inspiration”. It will also address the historical landscape of False Creek Flats, which used to be submerged.

Also on the dance card on November 26 is Sevrin Emnacen-Boyd. A member of Vancouver’s street-dance community dating back to 2006, Emnacen-Boyd is described as “a half Filipino b-boy, all-styles dancer, and an enthusiast of all things rhythmic and expressive”.

“He has organized a number of youth dance battles with the City of Surrey and currently judges, performs, and teaches across Canada,” the Co.ERASGA website states. “Sevi is also a renown competitor in the international breakdance scene and has traveled to many creative corners of the world including Amsterdam, Tokyo, New York City, and Manila. He is currently an active member in the Now Or Never Crew, Scndrlz, and Think Twice Japan.”

For tickets and more information, visit eventbrite.ca. Follow Charlie Smith on Twitter @charliesmithvcr. Follow Pancouver on Twitter @PancouverMedia.

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Charlie Smith

Charlie Smith

Pancouver editor Charlie Smith has worked as a Vancouver journalist in print, radio, and television for more than three decades.

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The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

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We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations. With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.