Pancouver-Logo

Become a Cultural Navigator

Become a Cultural Navigator

Hindustani-music loving Harry Manx brings Mysticssippi blues to Burnaby

Harry Manx
Harry Manx, who will be at the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts in Burnaby, is a true cultural navigator.

Somehow, it seems appropriate that Harry Manx is performing in Burnaby this evening (January 28). That’s because the good-natured Salt Spring Island blues musician is one of B.C.’s more intriguing cultural navigators. And Burnaby is one of Canada’s most diverse cities, with more than 120 languages spoken.

Burnaby also happens to be B.C.’s blues capital as the long-time host of the Burnaby Blues + Roots Festival.

Over the years, Manx has released a dozen albums. He’s won seven Maple Blues Awards and a Canadian Folk Music Award. In addition, Manx snared six Juno nominations.

His music is referred to as Mysticssippi blues because it brings together the traditions of Black music from Mississippi with Hindustani influences.

This Harry Manx video, “Death Has Mercy”, was filmed in Pune, India.

Burnaby welcomes globetrotting Manx

I interviewed Manx a few years ago. Here are some things I learned:

  • Many years ago, Manx joined an ashram in Pune created by the famous  Indian spiritual teacher Osho.
  • Osho and other spiritual masters in India inform his lyrics.
  • Manx lived for a while in Japan, busking for a living.
  • Even though he greatly admires slide guitarists such as Duane Allman, Jesse Ed Davis, Ry Cooder, and David Lindley, Manx’s most influential teacher was Indian musician Vishwa Mohan Bhatt.
  • In India, Manx learned about the emotions linked to each raga.
  • Manx enjoys playing the 20-stringed Mohan Veena, which was invented by Bhatt.

Manx will take the stage tonight at 8 p.m. in the Studio Theatre at the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts. For tickets, visit the Shadbolt Centre website. Follow Pancouver editor Charlie Smith on Twitter @charliesmithvcr. Follow Pancouver on Twitter @PancouverMedia.

Take Action Now

Pancouver fuels creativity and promotes a more inclusive society. You can contribute to support our mission of shining a spotlight on diverse artists. Donations from within Canada qualify for a tax receipt.

Share this article

Charlie Smith

Charlie Smith

Pancouver editor Charlie Smith has worked as a Vancouver journalist in print, radio, and television for more than three decades.

Subscribe

Tags

Related Articles

The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam Indian Band), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish Nation), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh Nation). With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.

The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

© 2023 The Society of We Are Canadians Too Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions

We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations. With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.