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Museum of Vancouver will host demonstration of Advanced Reflectionless Technology for curators and exhibitors

Mona Lisa
Some say that the Mona Lisa's background includes six different territories. Image by EsterNYCuniversity33.

Imagine what would occur if the Louvre decided to exhibit Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa in Vancouver.

First, the French museum would have to ensure safe transport of a masterpiece worth several hundred million dollars. Secondly, the Louvre would demand that the exhibitor maintain a precise temperature to avoid damaging the painting. Next, a great deal of time and effort would go into determining the lighting. Sufficient security would be necessary to prevent a major heist. There would also be some hefty insurance bills.

Now, consider if the Mona Lisa or other landmark works of art—such as Johannes Vermeer’s The Milkmaid or Salvador Dali’s The Persistence of Memory—could be shown in Vancouver without all these expenses?

A Taiwanese company hopes to make this possible. AUO Corporation has developed world-leading Advanced Reflectionless Technology, also known as A.R.T. It enables paintings to be exhibited digitally with stunning realism—at twice the resolution of its closest competitor.

On Friday (September 8) from 2 to 4 p.m., the Museum of Vancouver will host a demonstration of the reflectionless technology for exhibitors and curators.

My Fammily
Taiwanese painter Chen Cheng-po’s My Family was presented with A.R.T. at TAIWANfest.

Museum of Vancouver CEO Mauro Vescera told Pancouver that he sees potential for incorporating A.R.T. into exhibitions and educational programming. In the same interview, he revealed that he plans to ask his own questions at the event.

“It remains to be seen how much we utilize it and how we utilize it,” Vescera stated. “I saw an opportunity but I can’t quite define it yet.”

Charlie Wu
TAIWANfest organizer Charlie Wu explained how A.R.T. worked, using Chen Cheng-po’s paintings as examples.

Reflectionless technology shows brushtrokes

AUO Corporation says on its website that its reflectionless technology can be applied in a wide range of fields. They include off-site art curation of museums, galleries, and custom-made artworks for prolific art collectors.

At the recent TAIWANfest celebrations, there was a demonstration of A.R.T. on the second floor of the SFU Segal Building. A series of paintings by Taiwanese master Chen Cheng-po looked so authentic that visitors didn’t realize that these were digital representations. Attendees thought they were looking at originals until it was disclosed that these were electronic images.

TAIWANfest organizer Charlie Wu said at the time that the AUO Corporation’s reflectionless technology entails much more than digitally presenting the art. He noted that there’s also a great deal of sophisticated technology and skill involved in preparing the images. This is necessary to ensure that actual brushstrokes appear on-screen with proper colourization and shading.

It’s worth noting that the Museum of Vancouver has been a leader in advancing sustainability through exhibitions such as That Which Sustains Us and Realism + Repair: The Mahogany Project.

Wu said that exhibiting paintings with A.R.T. is far more sustainable than shipping masterpieces around the world. That’s because it would save on carbon emissions. Moreover, he added, private collectors may be more willing to display more of their paintings if they didn’t have to worry about them being damaged or stolen on their way to an exhibition.

The Museum of Vancouver will host a demonstration of AUO Corporation’s Advanced Reflectionless Technology (A.R.T.) for museum exhibitors and curators from 2 to 4 p.m. on Friday (September 8). To attend the event, email info@acsea.ca.

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Charlie Smith

Charlie Smith

Pancouver editor Charlie Smith has worked as a Vancouver journalist in print, radio, and television for more than three decades.

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Pancouver aims to build a more equal and empathetic society by advancing appreciation of visual and performing arts—and cultural communities—through education. Our goal is to elevate awareness about underrepresented artists and their organizations.

The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam Indian Band), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish Nation), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh Nation). With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.

Support us

Pancouver strives to build a more equal and empathetic society by advancing appreciation of visual and performing arts—and cultural communities—through education. Our goal is to elevate awareness about underrepresented artists and the organizations that support them. 

The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

© 2023 The Society of We Are Canadians Too Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions

We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations. With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.