Pancouver-Logo

Become a Cultural Navigator

Become a Cultural Navigator

North Shore Writers Festival features stellar lineup of local authors and poets

North Shore Writers Festival
Kung Jaadee is the author of popular children's books, as well as two textbooks on Indigenous issues.

The North Vancouver City Library’s new storyteller in residence, Kung Jaadee, will offer a traditional welcome at the North Shore Writers Festival. The two-day event features some well-known Metro Vancouver writers. The lineup includes recent Scotiabank Giller Prize nominee Kevin Chong, mystery writer and JUNO-nominated comedian Charlie Demers, and young-adult novelists Sarah Suk and Sabina Khan.

It all takes place at the City of North Vancouver Library (120 14th Street West, North Vancouver) on April 12 and 13.

Demers, author of the Dr. Annick Boudreau whodunnits Noonday Dark and Primary Obsessions, is the new host of the festival’s Literary Trivia Night. It runs from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on April 12. Captains can register teams of three to six for free on Eventbrite.ca. Audience members are also required to register to secure a spot.

It’s also free to register for Jaadee’s traditional welcome, which takes place on April 13 at 10 a.m. Jaadee, a.k.a. Roberta Kennedy, belongs to the X̱aayda (Haida), xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), Tlingit, and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. She is also part Hawaiian. According to her biography, she was born and raised on Haida Gwaii and is from the Yaguu’laanaas Raven Clan.

A previous Indigenous storyteller in residence at the Vancouver Public Library, Jaadee is the author of two textbooks, Haida Nation: Indigenous Communities in Canada and We Are Home. She has also written the children’s books Raven’s Feast and Gifts from Raven.

Margaret Gallagher CBC Radio One
CBC Radio One’s Margaret Gallagher has won many awards over the past two decades. Photo by CBC.

Festival includes North by Northwest host

In a recent interview on CBC Radio One’s North by Northwest program, Jaadee said that she was invited to apply for the artist in residence position when she was performing stories for elementary students in the City of North Vancouver Public Library.

“The biggest message that I’m sharing with every single audience is love,” Jaadee told CBC.

Another popular local author at the festival is JJ Lee, who wrote The Measure of a Man: The Story of a Father, a Son, and a Suit. From 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on April 13, he will speak about how to enliven the memoir-writing process. Like all other events at the festival, there’s free admission, but registration is encouraged.

Prospective poets will be interested in a panel discussion taking place from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. on April 13. This poetry workshop features published poets Sareh Farmand, Trish Gauntlett, Lisa Bagshaw, and Renée Sarojini Saklikar. That will be followed from 1 to 2 p.m. with a panel discussion on plant-based cooking with Lyndsay Sung, Bri Beaudoin, Desiree Nielsen and Joanna Tymkiw.

Meanwhile from 2:15 to 3:15, the festival will focus on young-adult fiction. Suk, author of Made in Korea and The Space Between Here and Now, will speak to Khan, the author of What a Desi Girl Wants, Meet Me in Mumbai, Zara Hossain Is Here, and The Love and Lies of Rukhsana Ali.

Next up from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. will be North by Northwest host Margaret Gallagher’s conversation with All the Quiet Places author Brian Thomas Issac.

The final speakers are Chong, author of The Double Life of Benson Yu, and ATOM Weight author Emi Sasagawa. Between 4:45 and 5:45 p.m., they will speak about how storytelling can be a way of moving forward when writing about trauma and tenderness.

Follow Pancouver on X @PancouverMedia and on Instagram @PancouverMedia.

Take Action Now

Pancouver fuels creativity and promotes a more inclusive society. You can contribute to support our mission of shining a spotlight on diverse artists. Donations from within Canada qualify for a tax receipt.

Share this article

Charlie Smith

Charlie Smith

Pancouver editor Charlie Smith has worked as a Vancouver journalist in print, radio, and television for more than three decades.

Subscribe

Tags

Related Articles

The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam Indian Band), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish Nation), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh Nation). With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.

The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

© 2023 The Society of We Are Canadians Too Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions

We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations. With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.