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Jully Black changes the lyrics of “O Canada” at the NBA All-Star Game to “our home on Native land”

Jully Black NBA screen shot
As Jully Black approached centre court to sing "O Canada", nobody had any idea that she was about to trigger a national conversation about the anthem. NBA screen shot.

Toronto R&B artist Jully Black has made waves on social media after a memorable rendition of “O Canada” at the NBA All-Star Game. However, it’s not because of her distinctive soulful sounds, emotionally laden middle section, unusual melody, or triumphal conclusion.

No, it’s because Black opened the national anthem by singing “our home on Native land” rather than “our home and native land”. Check it out below.

Watch Jully Black sing “O Canada” at the NBA All-Star Game.

Fans often refer to Black as Canada’s Queen of R&B, which is how she was introduced at the NBA All-Star Game. In addition, CBC once included her on a list of the “25 Greatest Canadian Singers Ever”.

Over the course of her career, Black has spoken out for Indigenous rights many times. Prior to her performance at the NBA All-Star Game, she shared her thoughts on how people have different views on what words should be used in “O Canada”.

Meanwhile, Robert Stanley Weir’s 1908 version, which is enshrined in federal legislation, includes the words “our home and native land”.

Even though Black performed the song in Vivant Arena in Salt Lake City, Utah, Black’s choice to sing “on Native land” is now the talk of Canada. Below, see what some folks are saying on Twitter.

Follow Pancouver editor Charlie Smith on Twitter @charliesmithvcr. Follow Pancouver on Twitter @PancouverMedia.

 

 

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Charlie Smith

Charlie Smith

Pancouver editor Charlie Smith has worked as a Vancouver journalist in print, radio, and television for more than three decades.

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The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam Indian Band), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish Nation), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh Nation). With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.

The Society of We Are Canadians Too created Pancouver to foster greater appreciation for underrepresented artistic communities. A rising tide of understanding lifts all of us.

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We would like to acknowledge that we are gathered on the traditional and unceded territories of the Coast Salish peoples of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm (Musqueam), Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish), and Səl̓ílwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations. With this acknowledgement, we thank the Indigenous peoples who still live on and care for this land.